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Resources for a better understanding.

With more and more academic research about yoga being published, finding good sources of information online is increasingly important. A group of scholars looking at yoga and based in the social sciences and humanities have therefore got together to develop a web-based resource for those interested in this field.

This initiative is run by a group of established scholars who conduct research on yoga which formed at the Yoga Darśana, Yoga Sādhana international yoga conference in Kraków, Poland in May 2022. Their aim is to develop a website that offers information about the best quality yoga-related research in the humanities and social sciences.

Yoga Darśana, Yoga Sādhana Conference 2024

Yoga Darśana, Yoga Sādhana: ‘Introspection, Inspiration, Institutionalisation’ is being held in Hamburg from 22nd to 25th May 2024.

The Yoga Darśana, Yoga Sādhana (YDYS) conference series serves as a platform for the critical examination and dynamic discussion of recent advancements in the field of Yoga Studies. Following the success of the previous conferences in 2016 and 2022 (at Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland), this upcoming event promises to build upon those achievements.

Find out more about the conference and how to submit a paper.

YDYS 2024 conference information

Latest Reflection

  • Cover of the Journal of Yoga Studies, Volume 5 (2024) New publication: Journal of Yoga Studies, Volume 5

    The fifth volume of the Journal of Yoga Studies, Volume 5 (2024) has been published and is available open access. The previous volume, no. 4, which was published last year (2023), contains fourteen articles, which comprise a wide variety of studies into yoga and bodily practices in South Asia and beyond, and illustrate the diversity of forms, styles and purposes inherent in the grand sweep of the history of yoga globally. In this edition there are three articles, which similarly reflect the diversity of current research into yoga, in both the past and the modern era. The three articles examine primary sources in Bengali, Mandarin Chinese and Sanskrit. The article by Ida Pajunen, “Yoga and Vyāyāma in New Bengali Sources,” explores the interface between yoga, health, bodybuilding and spirituality in the first half of the twentieth century in Bengal, and the role of particular women in the transformation of the practices and goals of yoga. “‘Mother of Yoga’: Zhang Huilan, Chris Butler, and the Popularization of Yoga in the People’s Republic of China” by Marc Lagace is a novel exploration of how yoga practices became popular in China in the 1970s. He highlights the role of two yoga teachers in particular, Zhang Huilan and Chris Butler, in the dissemination of yoga practices in China. Rocco Cestolo, in his article “Fading into Death through Pātañjalayoga: On the Apparent Dead-like State of the Yoga Practitioner Absorbed into Contentless Samādhi,” examines a crucial feature of traditional yoga practices, found in some commentaries on Pātañjala yoga and also in other sources: namely, the association between samādhi and a dead-like condition, in which the yogin appears to be dead, inert like a lump of wood, with no detectable breath. These insights reflect an important distinction between what might be called “traditional” and “modern” yoga, as practised outside South Asia in the twentieth century, as the goals of yoga practice are very different: either attempting to attain samādhi, employing various techniques, as in traditional yoga; or practising yoga for “spiritual” reasons, health or well-being, as in modern yoga. Matthew Clark on behalf of the JoYS Editorial Team: Jason Birch Jacqueline Hargreaves Suzanne Newcombe 2023 • Volume 5 Y OGA STUDIE S JOURNAL OF a crucial feature of traditional yoga practices, found in some commentaries on P ā tañjala yoga and also in other sources: namely, the association between sam ā dhi and a dead-like condition, in which the yogin appears to be dead, inert like a lump of wood, with no detectable breath. These insights reflect an important distinction between what might be called “traditional” and “modern” yoga, as practised outside South Asia in the twentieth century, as the goals of yoga practice are very different: either attempting to attain sam ā dhi , employing various techniques, as in traditional yoga; or practising yoga for “spiritual” reasons, health or well-being, as in modern yoga. Matthew Clark on behalf of the JoYS Editorial Team: Jason Birch Jacqueline Hargreaves Suzanne Newcombe Elizabeth De Michelis | Editorial 2 JournalofYogaStudies.org CITATION Clark, Matthew. 2024. “Editorial” In Journal of Yoga Studies (2024), Vol. 5: 1-2. DOI: https://doi.org/10.34000/JoYS.2023.V5.000

Yoga Research Mailing List

list@yogaresearch.org is a new email discussion group providing a forum for academic discussion among professional scholars of Yoga Studies.

Membership of the list is mainly open to scholars with an advanced degree and whose primary field is yoga studies. Sending a short academic CV is a requirement for approval.

Find out more about the list and how to join.

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Featured Researcher Profile

  • Dr Christopher Jain Miller Dr Christopher Miller

    Christopher Jain Miller, the co-founder and Vice President of Academic Affairs at Arihanta Institute, completed his PhD in the study of Religion at the University of California, Davis. He is a Visiting Researcher at the University of Zürich’s Asien-Orient-Institut and Visiting Professor at Claremont School of Theology where he co-developed and co-runs a remotely available Masters Degree Program focusing on Engaged Jain Studies. His current research focuses on Modern Yoga and Engaged Jainism. Christopher is the author of a number of articles and book chapters concerned with Jainism and the practice of modern yoga.

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